5 key things I learnt at Javaone2012

Having had a long plane ride back from San Francisco, I have had some time to mull over a very hectic and exciting week and what really came out of it. And I can tell you:-

1. Oracle is prepared to invest very heavily in Java. There were an awful lot of things to show off at Javaone (improvements to NetBeans, Glassfish, Nashorn, FX2, progress on Java 8, etc) and all the development team were hiring. And the Javaone/Oracleworld event was clearly big budget – any guesses what it must cost to hire all those venues, have a couple of roads closed for you by the city authorities and bring in all those music acts?

2. Java is alive and growing. The show was bigger and busier than 2011 with lots of companies showing off new products. JavaFX is now a very serious option for client development and even without Jigsaw, Java8 is going to be a big step forward.

3. Oracle is getting Java almost everywhere. A lot of effort had gone into getting Java running from everything from huge systems to the Rasperberry Pi. And while Jigsaw is delayed, profiles will give us some benefits before then. The two ‘elephants’ in the room are Android and Ios. There were 2 talks on IPad which we both cancelled (leading to alsorts of conspiracy theories).

4. Oracle is getting much better at handling this Community/partner thing. The Community keynote was very good and as one speaker said, Larry likes to win at everything so if he wants a Community, it will be the best. Oracle is also mending fences. James Gosling was back as a speaker at the Community keynote, talking about some very clever marine robots his current company deploys. The one critical bridge to mend is Google, who used to be a big part of the convention.

5. It is still worth the money going to the shows. Aside from the amazing free concerts organised, the interaction with Oracle and other developers and the chance to share ideas is priceless. Sitting at home coding that week is a false economy.

What did you think of Javaone 2012?

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Mark Stephens

System Architect and Lead Developer at IDRSolutions
Mark Stephens has been working with Java and PDF since 1999 and has diversified into HTML5, SVG and JavaFX. He also enjoys speaking at conferences and has been a Speaker at user groups, Business of Software, Seybold and JavaOne conferences. He has a very dry sense of humor and an MA in Medieval History for which he has not yet found a practical use.

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About Mark Stephens

Mark Stephens has been working with Java and PDF since 1999 and has diversified into HTML5, SVG and JavaFX. He also enjoys speaking at conferences and has been a Speaker at user groups, Business of Software, Seybold and JavaOne conferences. He has a very dry sense of humor and an MA in Medieval History for which he has not yet found a practical use.

6 thoughts on “5 key things I learnt at Javaone2012

  1. We had a booth in the JavaOne exhibit hall and this year was better than last year in terms of number of people and ow serious they were. The Java ecosystem is definitely alive and well from our viewpoint.

    • The exhibit hall got very busy as well and it was good to see a very wide range of companies exhibiting and also the different people visiting – our stand had a whole load of people from huge companies to independents.

      I think they could get even more exhibitors if they made it simpler to attend. We had to deal with totally separate companies for power and our stand. Did you think it was overly complex to organise a stand?

      • I think that’s standard for an exhibit – numerous vendors. The only one we had a problem with was the one with the badge scanners as the scanners locked up 4 times.

        What was ridiculous was 1.7K for an internet connection. We declined and then found that we could use the show wireless :)

        • The internet was ‘pricey’ even by show standards.

          Our badges scanner needed us to scan the code on the back of cards – which normally meant getting the person to fiddle and remove their badge.

          The actual talks used the barcode on the front so not sure why we needed 2 barcodes!

        • They came round to check scanners every day several times, so obviously expected some ‘issues’

  2. jeck

    So… what did you learn?

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