5 Reasons why Version 5 of our PDF to HTML5 Converter will be a big release

This Wednesday (17th April) will see the release of version 5 of our PDF to HTML5 converter, adding a multitude of new functionality and features. We requested your feedback about switching from Canvas to SVG a couple of weeks ago, and have been very busy since putting in lots of improvements to mark our version 5 release.

So what should you expect to see in tomorrow’s release?

1. Page Turning. Make your PDF content look like a real book or magazine by using our brand new page flipping mode, allowing you to click and drag corners of pages to flip them over and view the next page. By using HTML and CSS3, this mode retains all the benefits of native HTML content such as searchable, selectable text.

2. New Text Modes. We will be providing two new text modes to complete our range, providing flexibility for a wide range of use cases. To display shapes and images you have the choice of using SVG (providing vector zoom functionality (meaning that shapes will not blur as you zoom in)) or an image (which has large performance benefits).

3. IE6/7/8 Support. Not all browsers are capable of supporting HTML5, but almost all are capable of displaying text and images. Our files will detect what support the browser has and provide a fallback image instead of the SVG if the browser cannot display SVG. This means that our output will now even display in Internet Explorer 6 (and any other browser capable of displaying text and images)!

4. Optimised file size and greater performance. We have gone through our output with a fine tooth comb looking for places where there are large savings to be had. We have greatly reduced the file size of our output, and at the same time managed to greatly improve browser performance while loading and displaying our files.

5. Cleaner, clearer output. We have looked at our output to find ways that we can make it clearer. We have greatly reduced the complexity by switching to SVG from Canvas, and have made changes to make our code more browser friendly, resulting in a huge performance boost. We have also added better comments allowing you to better understand our output and be able to use it for your use case.

In addition to the above 5 points, there are also a large number of smaller bug fixes and improvements.

There will be additional articles after the release explaining how the new features work and changes you may need to know about.

Is there anything that you would like to see our PDF Conversion do?

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Leon is a developer at IDRsolutions and product manager for JPDF2HTML5. He is responsible for managing the JPDF2HTML5 product strategy and roadmap, and also spends a lot of his time writing code to build new features, improve functionality, fix bugs, and improve the testing for JPDF2HTML5.
Leon Atherton

About Leon Atherton

Leon is a developer at IDRsolutions and product manager for JPDF2HTML5. He is responsible for managing the JPDF2HTML5 product strategy and roadmap, and also spends a lot of his time writing code to build new features, improve functionality, fix bugs, and improve the testing for JPDF2HTML5.

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