My Top 10 takeaways from JavaOne 2013

netbeans_javaone_2013_icon125JavaOne 2013 has just finished. It has been a frantic week of talks, sessions, parties and opportunities to meet other developers. Here are my Top 10 takeaways from the week (in no particular order).

1. The Internet of things is finally  starting to come together (and lots of companies are looking at Java as a software platform for it). FreeScale did an impressive take at the Community KeyNote on how they saw Java linking it all in and providing one high-level platform for applications. James Gosling reminded us that Java had originally started out as a solution for embedded devices.

2. HTML5 is now a big area of interest. Even server guys have to worry about it!

3. JavaFX is now ready for prime time. It has a decent level of stability and functionality and companies are writing real applications in it.  JavaFX code is generally much more compact and easier to code than Swing.

4. Macs are a everywhere. Maybe it is the fact that it allows Java developers to use all 3 main platforms on one machine with virtualisation. Or maybe they just like the design…

5. Android is still ‘complicated’. A NetBeans android plugin was shown at the NetBeans community day and IDEA has Android support. But several Android sessions seem to have been cancelled. So it is still not clear what Oracle’s view is…

6. There are lots of Java developers hidden away in companies. A speaker from Goldman Sachs told us that 10% of their staff were developers, and the number one language in use was Java. Twitter also runs on Java.

7. It is still worth exhibiting and attending a big show  like JavaOne. This was not the best organised show I have attended (the usual cases of corporate incompetence with heroic individuals saving the day). And the show buses stopped at 6.30pm (when the talks finished at 9.30pm). But there a lot of outstanding sessions to attend (which have saved me months of working up the learning curve), lots of feedback and interest on our stand, lots of great people to meet and talk to (and some great parties and concerts).

8. Coding is for girls too! Stephan Janssen (the creator of Devoxx) has been organising Devoxx4Kids. And it turns out that 30-40% of the attendees are girls (and pretty good at coding to). As an industry, we need to see how we can incourage more to stay in IT.

9. Java is still a cool language for hacking. At the community keynote, the youngest speaker at the show (not yet 11), showed us how he had decompiled Minecraft so that he could hack it.

10. Java 8 is back to revolutionary. The last really big change in Java was Java 5 (2004) and all releases since then have been evolutionary. Java 8 sees changes to the libraries, the JVM and the API to support Lambda (which is going to change the way we can write Java).

That was my top 10 from the show. If you attended, what did you takeaway?

If you want more information on JavaOne 2013 and further coverage of the entire event check out our JavaOne 2013 Series Index, which covers everything that is happening and is constantly updated, keep checking back for new info!

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Mark Stephens

System Architect and Lead Developer at IDRSolutions
Mark Stephens has been working with Java and PDF since 1999 and has diversified into HTML5, SVG and JavaFX. He also enjoys speaking at conferences and has been a Speaker at user groups, Business of Software, Seybold and JavaOne conferences. He has a very dry sense of humor and an MA in Medieval History for which he has not yet found a practical use.

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About Mark Stephens

Mark Stephens has been working with Java and PDF since 1999 and has diversified into HTML5, SVG and JavaFX. He also enjoys speaking at conferences and has been a Speaker at user groups, Business of Software, Seybold and JavaOne conferences. He has a very dry sense of humor and an MA in Medieval History for which he has not yet found a practical use.

4 thoughts on “My Top 10 takeaways from JavaOne 2013

  1. Greg Brown

    > 1. The Internet of things is finally starting to come together

    Maybe. I still only seem to hear Oracle people talking about it.

    > 2. HTML5 is now a big area of interest

    HTML has been a big area of interest for a long time now. HTML 5 is just the next version (evolutionary, not revolutionary).

    > 3. JavaFX is now ready for prime time…companies are writing real applications in it

    Ha! That’s pure Oracle propaganda.

    > 5. Android is still “complicated”

    The Android APIs are certainly ugly. But that just sounds like more propaganda to me.

    > 10. Java 8 is back to revolutionary

    Agreed. I have not historically been a big fan of functional programming, but I’m looking forward to seeing how it works in Java.

  2. Greg,

    Thanks for your comments. Just to expand some of my points.

    1. ARM, Freescale an Qualcomm were all there talking about it and showing off devices.

    2. HTML5 is seen as a realistic apps development solution (especially as it supports offline).

    3. Several other companies were demoing stuff- the NASA demo using it for analysing mission data was very impressive.

    5. Complicated more from a business perspective. Several companies were talking Android and there was an Android plugin for NetBeans shown at the Community day. But no talks

    • Greg Brown

      > 1. ARM, Freescale an Qualcomm were all there talking about it and showing off devices.

      That’s cool. I’m actually pretty excited about the concept. I hope it takes off.

      > 2. HTML5 is seen as a realistic apps development solution (especially as it supports offline).

      My point was that HTML has been a realistic app development platform for a while. For example, I’d guess that most Java EE apps are driving HTML front ends. So I might have phrased this as “HTML continues to be a big area of interest”. But then again, I wasn’t at JavaOne and you were, so maybe I’m just missing something.

  3. That was point 7 ;-)

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