Mark Stephens

Mark Stephens has been working with Java and PDF since 1999 and has diversified into HTML5, SVG and JavaFX.

He also enjoys speaking at conferences and has been a Speaker at user groups, Business of Software, Seybold and JavaOne conferences. He has a very dry sense of humor and an MA in Medieval History for which he has not yet found a practical use.

Writing a JavaFX PDF Viewer plugin for Netbeans – 5. Making a standalone plugin

1 min read

Introduction

In the part 4, we created a NetBeans plugin. Now we want to turn it into a standalone plugin so that Netbeans users can use it.

Producing a Standalone plugin

If you were expecting this to be tricky, you are going to be disappointed. If you are creating a simple plugin, a single menu option will create the nbm (NetBeans Module file) to make a standalone plugin. This is a self-contained file with all the jars and code required.

make nbm

If you select the menu option, you will find inside the build directory of your project a brand new nbm file, ready to install.

nbm

Installing Your plugin

This guide shows you how to install the plugin. Note that once you have done this, NetBeans will use this version. If you want to develop the plugin further, you will need to uninstall the plugin.

Choose Window – plugins from the menu and there is an option to add a plugin. Locate the nbm file on your machine

install 

install2

Click on install and click Next, Accept terms. Lastly, you will be offered a warning if the plugin is not trusted or signed. Click on continue and Finish.

Close all windows and restart NetBeans, and you will now find the feature is available in the NetBeans IDE!

installed

NetBeans plugin portal

Once you have an nbm file, you can upload it to the NetBeans plugin portal. This provides a central location so that anyone can find your plugin. Here is the link to our new plugin. You will need to add a description, license and author to your project and build it again – the portal will not accept plugins which do not have this set.

license

 

description

Downloading the project or Jar

If you would like to download the source code for the project or the jpedalFX.jar file, please click here.

Summary

This week we have created a plugin from scratch. We will be expanding it over the course of 2014 to add lots of new features and show off additional features of the NetBeans IDE (we may even have to fix the odd bug or 2 and we will also update it for NetBeans 8). So stay tuned, and let us have your feedback and suggestions.

This post is part of our “NetBeans article Index” series. In these articles, we aim to explore NetBeans in different ways, from useful hint and tips, to our how-to’s, experiences and usage of the NetBeans IDE.

If you’re a first-time reader, or simply want to be notified when we post new articles and updates, you can keep up to date by social media (TwitterFacebook and Google+) or the Blog RSS.

Mark Stephens

Mark Stephens has been working with Java and PDF since 1999 and has diversified into HTML5, SVG and JavaFX.

He also enjoys speaking at conferences and has been a Speaker at user groups, Business of Software, Seybold and JavaOne conferences. He has a very dry sense of humor and an MA in Medieval History for which he has not yet found a practical use.

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