Mark Stephens

Mark Stephens has been working with Java and PDF since 1999 and has diversified into HTML5, SVG and JavaFX.

He also enjoys speaking at conferences and has been a Speaker at user groups, Business of Software, Seybold and JavaOne conferences. He has a very dry sense of humor and an MA in Medieval History for which he has not yet found a practical use.

Using Mercurial for Version Control with NetBeans

1 min read

As part of getting used to Mercurial, I have been experimenting with the support different Java IDEs offer for Mercurial Version Control. Recently I have been trying NetBeans and I thought it would make the basis of a good article. You can read all the other mercurial articles here.

NetBeans comes with Mercurial support built-in, which is a good thing. You can checkout a project and then there is a Mercurial menu option with all the settings.

Netbeans mercurial menuIt seems to be faster than Eclipse which is good. I think the difference between Fetch and Pull from Default options is that Fetch combines a Pull,  Merge and Commit. Status, Diff and Commit allow you you add your changes to your local repository which you can then Push. When a Pull results in a merge, NetBeans automatically asks if you would like to merge the two which is useful.

One feature I would like to see in NetBeans is that Eclipse lets me see changes before I pull them which I have not been able to replicate in NetBeans.

So NetBeans offers a pretty good Mercurial experience but it would be nice to see changes before pulling them. If you have tried Mercurial on NetBeans, what did you think of it?

NetBeans also have a nice spin on ignoring files. Mercurial has a file called .hgignore. NetBeans did not like my existing copy of .hgignore so you might want to delete and start from scratch. NetBeans lets you toggle whether you want to ignore a file or not. Other tools only let you add the file to the ignored list and you then have to edit it by hand if you make a mistake or need to change.

So NetBeans offers pretty good support for Mercurial although there is still scope for some enhancements like being able to see remote changes before you pull. If you have used Mercurial on NetBeans, what was your experience?

This post is part of our “NetBeans article Index” series. In these articles, we aim to explore NetBeans in different ways, from useful hint and tips, to our how-to’s, experiences and usage of the NetBeans IDE.

Mark Stephens

Mark Stephens has been working with Java and PDF since 1999 and has diversified into HTML5, SVG and JavaFX.

He also enjoys speaking at conferences and has been a Speaker at user groups, Business of Software, Seybold and JavaOne conferences. He has a very dry sense of humor and an MA in Medieval History for which he has not yet found a practical use.

Pros and Cons of Bitbucket Pipelines

Recently I have been looking at our current test suite looking for ways to improve our own tests. As we use Bitbucket we have...
Kieran France
3 min read

WTF: What’s The Future and Why It’s Up To…

If you want to know what is going to happen in the future, the person to ask is Tim O’Reilly. As well as being...
Bethan Palmer
2 min read

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *