PDF to JavaFX conversion – How to use NetBeans plugin (Part 1)

Having spent a lot of time working on JavaFx for our PDF to JavaFx convertor and NetBeans plugin, I thought it would be helpful to run a series of articles on JavaFx. I will kick off with a tutorial on how to use our PDF to JavaFx plugin for NetBeans.

After successfully installing the plugin you should notice a couple of new icons on the toolbar and a new PDF tab on the menu bar.

You can convert your PDF files to javaFX files in one of 2 ways. Firstly:-

By clicking the  button or going through the PDF tab on the menu bar will bring up a dialog box for you to choose the PDF file you want to convert to javaFX. After choosing the PDF file the conversion will begin. A progress bar will appear at the bottom right of the screen to update you on how many pages have bin converted.

Depending on the size of the file, time taken to convert varies. After the conversion, a dialog box containing the location and number of pages in the file created would be displayed.

This is will have the same name as the PDF file converted with the “-javaFX” suffix,  in the same directory as the PDF file. On opening this folder you should see a list of .java for example.

Now you have the javaFX files, create a new javaFx project in netbeans. Navigate to the “src” file of the project created and dump the whole folder with the “-javaFx” suffix. Right click on the project and click on properties option.

Once in the properties menu click on the Run option. This gives you a list of options however we are only interested in the “Application Class”. Click on the Browse button and a list of all the javaFx files should appear. Navigate to page one (in order to start from page one) and click on the select class button and and OK  in the properties menu.

Click on the Run button  and viola your PDF is in javaFX.

In my blog post I will show you how to convert a PDF to JavaFx files inside a project.

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Chika has written much of the JavaFX converter and also helps with the HTML5 converter. When not experimenting with the new features of JavaFX, he is a keen basketball player (he is the tall guy you might see at Devoxx).
Chika Okereke

About Chika Okereke

Chika has written much of the JavaFX converter and also helps with the HTML5 converter. When not experimenting with the new features of JavaFX, he is a keen basketball player (he is the tall guy you might see at Devoxx).

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