Mark Stephens

Mark Stephens has been working with Java and PDF since 1999 and has diversified into HTML5, SVG and JavaFX.

He also enjoys speaking at conferences and has been a Speaker at user groups, Business of Software, Seybold and JavaOne conferences. He has a very dry sense of humor and an MA in Medieval History for which he has not yet found a practical use.

First impressions of El Capitan on a Apple MacBook Pro

1 min read

Our Lead Developer was most impressed with El Capitan on the MacBook Pro…

At IDR Solutions I spend a lot of time working on our Java PDF Library and PDF to HTML5 Converter and use a MacBook Pro as my main machine. With a new OS update out I thought I would update my 2013 MacBook Pro with the latest version of OS X, I am now running the latest release of OS X.

Here is what you can expect….

1. A large download.

The update is 6 gigabytes in size so you want a fast connection and a ‘quiet’ time of the day.

2. A slick install.

Having suffered from the bug in IOS 9.0 update which hung on update, I was very pleased to see the update ran faultlessly.

3. Initial disappointment.

When you reboot your mac looks subtly different. There is a new font used for display, but otherwise it looks very similar to Mavericks. You need to dig a little deeper to find the new features, like split screen.

4. Is my machine faster?

Definitely feels zippier to me.

5. Reinstalling software.

I found that other than having to reinstall Java6 (to make CyberDuck work), everything worked perfectly with no changes.

6. The updates are all over the software.

The initial impression of the update is that very little has changed. Fire up Safari, Mail, Notes or Calendar and that impression is quickly dispelled with a whole load of features. I especially like the way the applications interact more closely, with Calendar picking up invites sent to Mail.

Overall, the impression is lots of small, incremental changes which make the machine much more usable (and you will not want to go back to Mavericks).

My big question is when will Apple start to introduce machines with touch screens as I now really want to swipe away?

MacBook-ProTouch
When will Apple introduce touch screen MacBooks?

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Mark Stephens

Mark Stephens has been working with Java and PDF since 1999 and has diversified into HTML5, SVG and JavaFX.

He also enjoys speaking at conferences and has been a Speaker at user groups, Business of Software, Seybold and JavaOne conferences. He has a very dry sense of humor and an MA in Medieval History for which he has not yet found a practical use.

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