Bethan Palmer

Bethan is a Java developer and product manager for JPedal at IDRsolutions. She has spoken at conferences including JavaOne and NetBeans day and has a degree in English Literature.

NetBeans Day Athens 2017

1 min read

NetBeans Day Athens

Yesterday I was lucky enough to attend NetBeans day in Athens. These events are a great way to meet other users of NetBeans and learn about a wide variety of topics. There were lots of useful talks and demonstrations, as well as all the latest news about NetBeans.

Welcome, NetBeans Days History and NetBeans Roadmap

The day started with a nice introduction from John Kostaras. He discussed what NetBeans day is and how you can get involved. You can find up to date information on upcoming events on the NetBeans website. In fact the next event is being hosted in London on 25th April.

Geertjan Wielenga outlined the history of NetBeans and where it is going next. The big news for NetBeans’ future is that it is moving to Apache (although many of the people committed to the project are Oracle employees). The nice thing about this is that we as a community can decide what features will be in each release. If there is a missing feature or bug, there will be no reason to complain to Oracle – the community can work together to improve NetBeans.

We also found out how you can get involved with NetBeans: you can join the NetCat testing programme, the teaching community, translators’ community, or encourage kids to learn programming through MineCraft (find out more here) to name but a few.

Talks and Demos

Geertjan Wielenga showed us Oracle JET (JavaScript Extension Toolkit), Oracle’s official standardised solution for JavaScript applications. This is used for the front end of web applications, and there is a cookbook containing lots of example code which you can copy into your own application.

Next Kostas Saidis gave a talk on ECMAscript. ECMAscript is a specification for JavaScript. This began with a history of EMAscript and went on to talk about NetBeans support for it.

After this we had a talk on Spring Boot with NetBeans from Alexius Diakogiannis. He showed us how to make an application with the NB Springboot plugin, and use actuator endpoints to monitor your application.

Panagiotis Adamopoulos then spoke about PHP and NetBeans. This talk focused on busting myths about PHP. Some believe it is not a proper language, and often it is seen as slow, easy to hijack and only useful for websites. Panagiotis showed that all of these assumptions are not true.

Finally, John Kostaras showed us how to port a Swing application to DukeScript using the NetBeans plugin. He demonstrated how you can use DukeScript to create a desktop, web and mobile applications all from one code base. The pros to DukeScript are that you can write all your code in Java (especially good if you don’t like JavaScript), you only have to write it once and can run it everywhere, and the API is similar to JavaFX. The cons are that you do still have to learn a new API, and there is not a lot of documentation. As a nice finale, Anton Epple, one of the creators of DukeScript, joined us on Skype to answer our questions.

If you want to find out more, the slides from the presentation are being added to the NetBeans day Github repository.

 

Bethan Palmer

Bethan is a Java developer and product manager for JPedal at IDRsolutions. She has spoken at conferences including JavaOne and NetBeans day and has a degree in English Literature.

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