Favourite resources from our HTML development team

HTML Tags

As the web progresses and grows, so do the technologies that come along with it. Trying to keep on top of everything you need to know can be overwhelming due to the rapid pace at which things change. You could struggle to get a piece of functionality working for you just the way you want and find out there’s an API that would have saved you hours of your time. You could implement a cool new package you decided to adopt only to realise it doesn’t work on many of the most popular web browsers.

Here are our favourite HTML resources to ensure we are constantly using the best technologies to suit our web needs.

CSS Tricks

CSS Tricks is a great website to discover new technologies that may be useful to you. The site usually talks about specific functionality and will often point to useful APIs that can ease the development process. The articles are detailed tutorials and use of visuals to make the content easy to follow. The tutorials also make use of interactive demos to display the end results allowing you to easily see if it suits your needs; some of these demos also allow you to change the code itself and tailor it to the things that are important to you.

Mozilla Developer Network (MDN)

MDN is our go-to resource for web APIs. An API’s page is logically split and can be jumped to using the navigation widget. The content is descriptive without seeming overcrowded. The pages usually list the functions along with their parameters and provides descriptions of what each are. It also provides small code snippets as examples and even links to other MDN pages for a more in-depth look at implementation.

Overall, MDN provides detailed resources that are good for both researching functionality as well as implementing it.

Can I Use

Can I Use is a great website to use after you have found your “dream” package. It lists many popular APIs and provides an overview of which browsers will support them.

The page displays a column for each of the popular desktop and mobile browsers along with a list of versions for each. It then shows the extent of support each browser version provides for the package, whether that is full, none at all or partial. The site accounts for partial functionality by describing which specific parts of a package will be usable/unusable within a certain browser (or version).

On top of this, it specifies what percentage of global traffic is using a particular version of a browser. So if you know that a package is not supported by iOS Safari 10.3 which Can I Use shows accounts for 8% of global traffic, you may want to consider other options.

Honourable mentions

W3 – A great place to see the latest web specification.
GitHub – Plenty of useful, well-supported 3rd party packages can exist on GitHub and their API/Examples/Use Cases all tend to be there in one place.

So, what are your favourite HTML development resources?

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Ovidijus Okinskas

Java Developer / Support at IDRsolutions
Ovi is a developer at IDRsolutions, currently working on JPDF2HTML5. He enjoys self-help reading, batch- cooking and card games.

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ovi

About Ovidijus Okinskas

Ovi is a developer at IDRsolutions, currently working on JPDF2HTML5. He enjoys self-help reading, batch- cooking and card games.

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