What is new in PDF Spec 2.0?

After 8 years in the making, PDF 2.0 has finally been released. From new annotations, to digital signatures, to generally making the specification clearer and more concise, there’s been a lot of changes and improvements since 1.7.

PDF 2.0 Logo

As there are too many changes to list in this 984-page behemoth, here is a brief overview of the ones I thought were most important:

Enhanced encryption:

With PDF 2.0 comes a newer, stronger version of the AES encryption algorithm, AES-256. All previous encryption methods have been deprecated. Furthermore, PDF 2.0 supports Unicode passwords too.

New annotations:

New annotation types have been introduced to support projections, rich media and 3D annotations. Rich media has replaced Movie and Sound annotations, providing a single framework for video / audio / 3D / animations / etc. You can even mix video and 3D, such as having a video as a texture on a 3D object…

Geospatial features:

New PDF data structures that support Geospatial coordinate systems (latitude / longitude / altitude), allowing PDF to be extensively used for maps and satellite imagery in both 2D and 3D.

Major enhancements to digital signature technology:

PAdES Compatibility has been added, bringing the capabilities of PDF up to EU and ETSI Digital Signature standards. Long term validation of signatures has also been introduced in the form of Document Security Store (DSS) and Document Time-Stamp (DTS) dictionaries, which replaces the now-deprecated SHA1.

Other features:

Plus, a few honourable mentions:

  • Unencrypted wrapper document
  • Associated files
  • Navigators
  • Enhancements for print and rendering-related features

There has been some extensive rewriting / reorganising of large sections of the spec, including:

  • Rendering (10.1 & 10.3)
  • Accessibility support (14.9)
  • Digital signatures (12.8)
  • Metadata (14.3)

Finally, some features have been dropped. To name a few:

  • XFA Forms
  • Movie and sound content (replaced by Rich Media annotations)
  • All encryption methods (except AES-256)
  • SHA1
  • Encryption of FDF files.

You can read more on PDF 2.0 here.
There’s also a great keynote on PDF 2.0 given by the ISO 32000 Project Leaders, Duff Johnson and Peter Wyatt.

If you’re a first-time reader, or simply want to be notified when we post new articles and updates, you can keep up to date by social media (TwitterFacebook and Google+) or the  Blog RSS.

Related Posts:

The following two tabs change content below.

Rob

Java Developer / Support at IDRSolutions
Rob is a developer at IDRSolutions, currently working on JPedal. In his spare time he enjoys riding his motorcycle, playing guitar and studying languages that don't require a semicolon at the end of each line (Japanese, Ruby and Chef at the moment).
Rob

About Rob

Rob is a developer at IDRSolutions, currently working on JPedal. In his spare time he enjoys riding his motorcycle, playing guitar and studying languages that don't require a semicolon at the end of each line (Japanese, Ruby and Chef at the moment).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>