Mark Stephens Mark has been working with Java and PDF since 1999 and is a big NetBeans fan. He enjoys speaking at conferences. He has an MA in Medieval History and a passion for reading.

How to choose JPG versus JPEG2000 for image files

1 min read

Since we started to support both JPG and JPG2000 as image file outputs in our software, we have found that this is a very common question. So I thought a brief general explanation would be helpful.

JPG versus JPEG2000

JPG files have the file endings .jpg .jpeg .jpe .jif .jfif .jfi while JPEG2000 files finish with .jp2 .jpx .j2c .j2k .jpf. So kitten.jpg is a JPG file and kitten.jp2 would be a JPEG2000 version.

JPG is the original standard and JPEG2000 is the newer format. Both are open ISO standards with documentation online. If you want to read up, good starting points are https://jpeg.org/ or https://jpeg.org/jpeg2000/

JPEG2000 has some interesting new features, but it is not a direct replacement for JPG – there are still things JPG does better and not all tools currently support JPEG2000. The documentation online tends to be very technical and tell you about lots of the features (JPEG2000 ROI for example) but not the pros and cons.

So I asked our development team to summarise for me in reasonably non-technical language the benefits of each.

JPG is really good for

  • Optimum for small images 
  • is widely supported

It is not so good for

  • Not that great for scanned images containing text
  • Low compression ratio for lossy compression 

How does JPEG2000 vary?

  • Better on large images (smaller images jpg is still smaller).
  • Single decompression architecture
  • Lossy and lossless compression   
  • No universal browser support
  • Encoding is CPU intensive and encoding is not as fast and easy as encoding in jpeg.
  • file format is less likely to be affected by ‘bit errors’ and other file system errors due to its more efficient coding structure
  • Not backward compatible 
  • File extension:
  • handling JPEG 2000 files is much more complex and requires more memory to process.

So my take is that I will use

JPG where I need to ensure it works on everything, have small images and do not need to get the smallest possible file sizes.

JPEG2000 where I have fast machines, want the best compression and am confident the users will be able to view them.

Which will you be using?

IDRsolutions develop a Java PDF Viewer and SDK, an Adobe forms to HTML5 forms converter, a PDF to HTML5 converter and a Java ImageIO replacement. On the blog our team post anything interesting they learn about.

Mark Stephens Mark has been working with Java and PDF since 1999 and is a big NetBeans fan. He enjoys speaking at conferences. He has an MA in Medieval History and a passion for reading.

3 reasons Java developers switch to JDeli from ImageIO

ImageIO is build into the JDK and provides basic image support in Java. JDeli is a commercial image library for Java Developers from IDRsolutions....
Mark Stephens
1 min read

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

IDRsolutions Ltd 2019. All rights reserved.