GlassFish is an open-source application server project started by Sun Microsystems for the Java EE platform and now sponsored by Oracle Corporation, and supports Enterprise JavaBeans, JPA, JavaServer Faces, JMS, RMI, JavaServer Pages, servlets, etc. This allows developers to create enterprise applications that are portable and scalable, and that integrate with legacy technologies.
GlassFish is based on source code released by Sun and Oracle Corporation’s TopLink persistence system. It uses a derivative of Apache Tomcat as the servlet container for serving Web content, with an added component called Grizzly which uses Java New I/O (NIO) for scalability and speed.

GlassFish

Getting JAI JPEG2000 to run on Glassfish server without…

If you are using JPEG2000 images you will need the JAI jars to decode them. Although these projects appear essentially dead, they are still...
suda
1 min read

Why your API needs web services

A few days ago an interesting query was raised by one of our customers. They queried whether it was possible for us to write...
Alex Marshall
1 min read

2 ways to make your Java programs accessible to…

After you have developed an application in Java you want to make it accessible to as many potential users as possible. The Java ecosystem...
Mark Stephens
1 min read

Highlights from JavaOne 2012 Day 0 – Sunday

The GlassFish party at The Thirsty Bear deserves a mention – unfortunately I did not get any photos from there. Arun got one of...
Leon Atherton
44 sec read

A simple Glassfish example in NetBeans – a little…

Seeing as I am giving a short talk at JavaOne 2012 concerning GlassFish and our usage of it and how potentially it could help...
Lyndon Armitage
2 min read