There are three types of fonts, True Type is an outline font standard developed by Apple Computer in the late 1980s as a competitor to Adobe’s Type 1 fonts used in PostScript. It has become the most common format for fonts on both the Mac OS and Microsoft Windows operating systems.
OpenType fonts are related to TrueType fonts, but have a greater basic character set, including small capitalization, an old-style numerals system, and more capable of detailing shapes, such as glyphs and ligatures. OpenType fonts easier to read and readable in all sizes and can be sent to any printer or other output device that is supported by Windows.
PostScript fonts (like Adobe type 1 & type 2 fonts are smooth, detailed, and of high quality and are good for printing, especially professional printing, for example books or magazines.

Fonts

PDF to HTML5’s Holy Grail – Vertical positioning for…

It’s safe to say that if someone designed fonts from scratch today they’d be very different on the inside. As with many technologies, the...
Sam Howard
1 min read

WOFF 2.0: What is it, why is it coming,…

WOFF 2.0 is working its way towards being a standard recommended by the W3C, so it seems like a good time to look at...
Sam Howard
2 min read

Web fonts: A quick introduction to Wrapper and Glyph…

I was planning to write about WOFF 2.0 this week, and wanted to link to a previous article I’d written which explains the structure...
Sam Howard
1 min read

PDFs have no sense of direction, literally

Whilst working on the JPedal Java PDF Library at IDR Solutions I recently came across an interesting issue where Hebrew words could only be...
Kieran France
2 min read

5 tips for using fonts in HTML5

We’ve spent a lot of time making sure that fonts inside PDFs look good when run through our PDF to HTML5 converter. In the...
Sam Howard
1 min read